The 10 Best RV Trips to Take in Alaska - Must See! (2022)

There’s pretty much no place more picturesque than Alaska to take an RV road trip in America. The state’s spectacular landscapes and laid-back locals put Alaska at the top of many travelers’ lists, and for good reason. Plus, it’s one of the few places you can visit in the summer where you can still wear your scarves, boots, and jackets!

Whether you’re a long-time RV owner or just renting a camper for your vacation, Alaska is home to many great RV parks and campgrounds in some of the country’s most scenic destinations. And from Denali National Park to the Matanuska Glacier, you’ll find plenty of must-see sights along the way.

Ready to dive in and start planning your trip? Here’s our free Alaska RV travel guide, with what we think just might be the 10 best stops across the state.

1. Denali National Park

First up on the Alaska RV trip itinerary is Denali National Park. If you’re planning a trip to the so-called Last Frontier, it’s almost certain you came for the views and, at 6 million acres, there’s no shortage of sights to see within Denali. The park is open year round, but the peak season usually runs from late May until early September. Whether you choose to explore Denali by bus or helicopter (private vehicles aren’t allowed on most of the road), you’re likely to spot bears, moose, and caribou along the way. Park rangers also lead group hiking tours for those looking for a bit more guidance during their time in the park. And don’t leave without paying a visit to the on-site kennels to check out Denali’s own sled dogs! They’re one of the park’s biggest attractions and most beloved creatures.

Location:Mile 237, Highway 3, Denali Park, AK99755

Contact:(907) 683-9532

Price: $10 per person entrance fee, free for children 15 and under (fee good for seven days at the park)

Website:https://www.nps.gov/dena/

Where to Stay:

Three of the park’s onsite campgrounds (the Riley Creek Campground, Savage River Campground, and Teklanika River Campground) are open to RVs, though Savage River and Teklanika River are only open during the summer months. Unfortunately, none of the three can accommodate RVs larger than 40 feet, so if your camper is longer, you’ll have to look outside the park. Luckily, there are plenty of options within a short drive. Denali Rainbow Village is the closest full-service RV park, while McKinley RV and Campground offers 50 campsites with full hookups and pull-through sites. Don’t worry if renting an RV is still on your agenda, as finding rentals nearby is a cinch.

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2. The Santa Claus House

Whether or not you celebrate Christmas, you can still have a charmed time at the real North Pole, just south of Fairbanks. The tiny city was incorporated in 1953, and its 2,000 or so residents now live on streets like Snowman Lane and Kris Kringle Drive.While the town brings holiday cheer to travelers throughout the entire year, things really get buzzing in the weeks before Christmas, when the local post office receives countless letters to Santa. The biggest attraction (naturally) is the Santa Claus House, where you’ll find live reindeer, 9,000 square feet of Christmas shopping, and a three-story-tall Santa statue out front. Even in July, you’ll be humming Christmas carols all the way home.

Location:101 St Nicholas Dr, North Pole, AK 99705

Contact:(800) 588-4078

Website:http://www.santaclaushouse.com/

Where to Stay:

(Video) RVing to Alaska: 10 Must Have Tips + Resources + Links

After a day of cocoa and Christmas carols, head over to the nearbyRiverview RV Park on the Chena River. The campground has 160 sites with full hookups and on-site laundry facilities. But if you’d rather drive on to Fairbanks, there are plenty of other campgrounds in the area to choose from.

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3.Matanuska Glacier Hike

There are glaciers throughout Alaska, but the 24-mile-long Matanuska Glacier has the distinction of being the largest U.S. glacier accessible by vehicle. Take advantage bybooking a guided glacier tour with Matanuska Glacier Adventures of Alaska, where you’re bound to have a once in a lifetime experience. As one of the best RV trips Alaska has to offer, you’ll hike through the ancient ice and learn more about how glaciers form and grow. All your equipment and gear is included, though you’ll definitely want to bundle up in your warmest layers!

Location:66500 Glacier Park Rd, Sutton, AK 99674

Contact:(888) 253-4480

Price: $100 for a guided tour, $30 for unguided access

Website:http://matanuskaglacieradventures.us

Where to Stay:

After a long day at the glaciers, head out to the Grand View Cafe and RV Park, which has 25 RV campsites (19 of which are pull-through). Grand View is only open from May to September, though, so if you’re traveling outside of those dates, trythe family-owned Pinnacle Mountain RV Park, which is open throughout the year and has both an on-site grocery store and restaurant.

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4. The Northern Lights in Fairbanks

Looking for Alaska RV trip ideas that are simply unforgettable? Head to Fairbanks to catch the Northern Lights (also known as the Aurora Borealis) in all their glory. Most people take a trip to Alaska during the warmer summer months, but if you’re one of the rare travelers who pay a visitafter September, all the better— the Northern Lights are best seen in the late fall, winter, and early spring. Fairbanks is one of the best places to catch a glimpse of the lights, which illuminate the sky in shades of aqua, green, yellow, and red. As they say, the best things in life are free, so grab a bite to eat and ask a local where they like to go to check out the lights. Then, bundle up, make a Thermos of coffee, and head out for a night of peace and quiet.

Location: Fairbanks, AK

Website:http://www.alaska.org/things-to-do/northern-lights-viewing

Where to Stay:

There are plenty of RV campgrounds around Fairbanks so don’t worry about finding a place to stay! River’s Edge RV Park has 167 sites as well as both full and basic hookups. There’s also the Chena River Wayside RV Park, which offers 56 back-in RV sites and free WiFi. The state-run campground is located on 26 acres of a scenic wooded forest right along the Chena River. For more options near Fairbanks, check out this list of the 10 best campgrounds in Alaska.

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5.Totem Bight State Historic Park

Next up on our list of Alaska RV road trips is the Totem Bight State Historic Park, located just north of Ketchikan in Borough, Alaska. The U.S. Forest Service began restoration of dozens of abandoned Native American totem poles in 1938, leading to the eventual creation of the replicas now found at the Totem Bight site. Learn more about the cultures of theTlingit and Haida Indians while taking in the sights of the natural surroundings and ocean view.

(Video) Ultimate Alaska Road Trip: Where to Go, What to See, What to Do! | Newstates Go North: EP13

Location:9883 N Tongass Hwy, Ketchikan, AK 99901

Contact:(907) 247-8574

Price: free

Website:http://dnr.alaska.gov/parks/units/totembgh.htm

Where to Stay:

Your best bet for RV camping near Ketchikan is the nearbyClover Pass Resort, which offers full hookups, coin laundry, and its own shuttle to nearby attractions. Recreational fishers will also enjoy the salmon and halibut that can be caught on site. And if you’re itching to get out on the water, boat rentals are available for a reasonable cost.

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6. Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center

If you’re looking for ideas for Alaska RV trips with kids, look no further than the Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center. Spanning 200 acres, the center serves to teach the public about the state’s vast array of wildlife. More than just an educational center, though, AWCC is also a sanctuary that cares for orphaned and injured animals, including bison, black bears, eagles, deer, and foxes. Free animal programs are offered throughout the week to show visitors how the center’s staff nurses animals back to recovery and cares for them once they’re healthy.

Location:Mile 79 Seward Highway, Portage, AK 99587

Contact:(907) 783-2025

Price: $15 for adults, $10 for youth ages 7 to 17, and free for children 6 and under

Discounts: seniors, military

Website:https://www.alaskawildlife.org/

Where to Stay:

Only four minutes down the road from the Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center is the family-owned and operated Portage Valley RV Park, the only RV campground in the area with electric and water. After that, your next best bet is about 20 minutes away at the Bird Creek Motel and RV Park, where you’ll find eight RV campsites with 20-amp power and water.

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7.Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park

After locals discovered gold in northwest Canada in 1896, nearly 100,000 men made the pilgrimage up north, hoping to strike it big. Many of them came through Skagway, Alaska, where they loaded up on the required year’s worth of supplies, equipment, and food to avoid starvation. While it later became a ghost town, much of the historic downtown has been preserved by the National Park Service as a way to remember one of the country’s most iconic moments in time. Whether you’re a history buff or just passing through, there’s plenty to do at the park, including taking a guided tour of downtown, hiking the nearby Chilkoot Trail, or checking out some of the interactive exhibits at the visitors’ center.

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Location:291 Broadway, Skagway, AK 99840

Contact:(907) 983-9200

Price: free

Website:https://www.nps.gov/klgo/index.htm

Where to Stay:

Pullen Creek RV Park is just one block away from the Klondike Gold Rush park and offers 34 gravel sites and 12 harbor sites with electric and water hookups. You can also check out the Garden City RV Park, which is walking distance to Skagway’s historic district.

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8. The Homer Spit

It may sound weird, but the Homer Spit is actually just a four-and-half mile piece of land that juts out into the Kachemak Bay. And there’s good reason why it comes recommended near the top of almost any list of Alaska RV vacations. The boat harbor is surrounded by sweeping views of glacier-capped mountains and miles upon miles of mirror-smooth water. There’s something for everyone at the Spit, from shopping to boating to fishing, and if you catch something you like, there are even restaurants that will cook up your catch. Homer is also known as the arts capital of Alaska, so be sure to check out the galleries while you’re there. Before you leave, take the 23-mile trip north to Anchor Point, which is the westernmost point in the U.S. that’s accessible by road.

Location:Homer Spit, Homer, AK 99603

Website:http://www.alaska.org/detail/the-homer-spit

Where to Stay:

The City of Homer operates its own RV park from April 1 to October 30 on a first-come, first-serve basis. But if the campground is full, the Alaska Heritage RV Park is conveniently located right next to the Spit’s famous fishing hole. Alaska Heritage has full hookups, free WiFi, coin laundry, an espresso bar, and even its own half-mile of private beach. And because it’s right on the water, the views are unbeatable.

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9. Chena Hot Springs

After zipping around Alaska’s glaciers and ice-capped mountains, give yourself permission to warm up at the Chena Hot Springs near Fairbanks. With an average year-round water temperature of 106 degrees Fahrenheit, it’s a surreal experience plunging into the bath-like water in one of the chilliest places in the world. Some even believe the water, with its mix of steam and minerals, has healing powers. When you’re ready to cool down again, head over to the Chena Hot Springs Resort’s Aurora Ice Museum, where you can check out incredible ice sculptures from world champion ice carvers Steve and Heather Brice. Cap the night off with an appletini in a carved ice martini glass at the Aurora Ice Bar to end a relaxing day you’ll never forget.

Location:56.5 Chena Hot Springs Rd, Fairbanks, AK 99711

Contact:(907) 451-8104

Price: $15 for adult entrance to the springs, $15 for entrance to the Aurora Ice Museum

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Discounts: seniors, children

Website:https://chenahotsprings.com

Where to Stay:

If you’re traveling from May 15 to September 15, you can stay right on the premises at one of the springs’ 24 campsites. No electric or plumbing hookups are available, but the campground does have drinking water and a dump station available for guests. Looking for something slightly more accommodating? The nearby Northern Moosed RV Park & Campground has pull-through campsites with both full and partial hookups, while the Riverview RV Park has 160 full hookup sites, the majority of which are pull-throughs that can accommodate RVs as large as 70 feet. You can also try the “C” Lazy Moose RV Park down the road, which has full hookups as well as laundry facilities and WiFi.

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10. Alaskan Brewing Co.

Located in Juneau, Alaskan Brewing Co. is (as you might guess) the oldest brewery in Alaska. Started in 1986 by Marcy and Geoff Larson, Alaskan now brews seven beers year round, with about eight other rotating seasonal and limited edition varieties. Alaskan Amber is the brewery’s most well-known classic, but its Summer Ale, Mocha Milk Stout, and Icy Bay IPA are also worth trying. The tasting room welcomes guests throughout the year and tours are given to visitors every day at the beginning of each hour. When you’re done, belly up to the bar for a single beer or flight, or better yet, grab a six-pack to go— Alaskan is only available in 19 states, so take some home for future enjoyment.

Location:5429 Shaune Dr, Juneau, AK 99801

Contact: (907) 780-5866

Price: $20 for a guided tour with seven samples

Website:https://alaskanbeer.com/visit/

Where to Stay:

Not far up the road is the pet-friendly Spruce Meadow RV Park, which has 47 campsites with full hookups and WiFi. You can also try the Auke Bay RV Park, anotherpet-friendly campground with electric and water hookups.

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That’s it!

We hope you’ve enjoyed our Alaska RV travel tips! Remember that our picks aren’t listed in geographical order, so if you’re planning on traveling from one destination to another, be sure to create your own map so you can find the route that best makes sense for your trip. Less time spent in your RV means more time for actual sightseeing and exploring!

Since many businesses are seasonal in Alaska, it’s typically a good idea to call ahead to specific campgrounds or sites before you make the drive. Generally speaking, most places are open between mid-May and mid-September, when the weather is nice and visitors pour in from all over the world. If you’re hearty enough to travel during the off-season, more power to you! Just be aware that finding a meal or a campground may be more of a struggle than if you were traveling in the summer.

That’s it for our Alaska RV trip planner! Whether you find yourself at the Chena Hot Springs or the Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, we think you’ll agree that there’s no shortage of incredible sights to see during the span of your RV road trip. No matter where your travels take you, we wish you a fun and relaxing time in The Last Frontier.

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(Video) RVing in Alaska - Our 5 Favorite Places | Newstates in the States

FAQs

Is Alaska RV friendly? ›

Alaska is one of the only places in the world where it's legal to pull over anywhere and RV boondock style. Highway pullouts, shoulders, and other areas off the road are prime spots for getting some sleep and prepping for the next day's travel.

How long does it take to drive an RV to Alaska? ›

Reasons to ship your RV to Alaska

For most RVers, figure about 8-10 days of driving. Driving the fabled Alcan Highway is something a lot of RVers want to do at least once. There are lots of things to see and do along the route.

How do I plan my RV itinerary? ›

6 steps to planning a successful RV road trip
  1. Choose the right RV for the road trip you want to plan. ...
  2. Make a plan that matches your budget. ...
  3. Book campsites far in advance of your departure date if possible. ...
  4. Plan an RV-friendly route. ...
  5. Research RV parking in advance. ...
  6. Adjust your estimated time of arrival.
18 Jun 2020

How do I get to Alaska by RV? ›

The Alaska Highway is the only way to get into Alaska from the lower 48, and there are two different travel routes you can take to get there: either from the start of the Alaska Highway in Dawson Creek, British Columbia or via the Stewart-Cassiar Highway.

Can you take an RV on Alaska ferry? ›

Most vehicle ferries ( Alaska ferries & BC ferries ) can accommodate recreational vehicles & tows up to 70' long & 13' high. Anyone taking a vehicle up the Inside Passage during the high season, especially those driving large units, should reserve summer ferry space before February.

What should I pack for an RV trip to Alaska? ›

What Should You Pack for an RV Trip Through Alaska?
  • Rain Gear. It's always a good idea to pack a rain jacket or a rain shell for those wet, rainy days. ...
  • Thermal Long Johns. ...
  • Light Pants or Shorts. ...
  • Hiking Shoes. ...
  • Backpack. ...
  • Reserve an RV Rental from Us Today.
1 Jun 2021

Can I drive my RV through Canada to Alaska? ›

RVs of all categories can all be driven to Alaska. No matter what camper you drive, you'll pass through Canada when driving to Alaska from the continental U.S. You'll need to keep in mind a few things while visiting our “neighbor to the north.”

Can you Boondock in Alaska? ›

In fact, almost the entire state is open to boondocking. Most of the highways have pull-outs on them where boondocking is permitted, and Alaska 511 is your North Star to navigate these highways and potential road closures. The Last Frontier is by far the most boondocking friendly state in the union.

Can you camp on the side of the road in Alaska? ›

Roadside Tent Camping in Alaska

Alaska law permits limited camping to to accommodate these special outdoor recreational styles. Pitching tents next to Alaska's roadsides can best be done in one of the supplied roadside rest areas or at any wide pullouts.

What do I need for my first RV trip? ›

RV and Camping Needs
  1. Flashlights and headlamps.
  2. Refillable water bottles.
  3. Clothes (be sensible)
  4. Sunscreen and insect repellant.
  5. Camping chairs.
  6. Deck of cards.
  7. Outdoor rug.
  8. Smart phone or tablet.
16 Jan 2018

Where should I stay when traveling in an RV? ›

5 RV-Friendly Places to Park your RV For Free
  • Small Towns. Generally, smaller towns will welcome RVs on public parking spaces, since RV travelers are a boon to the local economy. ...
  • Truck Stops. ...
  • Businesses. ...
  • Rest Areas and Turnouts. ...
  • Off-Road Sites.
9 Oct 2019

How much does RV Trip Wizard cost? ›

The annual fee for RV Trip Wizard is $59. The cost includes an RV Life Pro account that grants you access to trip planning in RV Trip Wizard and RV GPS routing with the RV Life app along with everything else included in RV Life Pro.

Is Camping free in Alaska? ›

More than half of Alaska consists of public lands, so you can find free dry campsites near Denali, the Kenai Fjords, Glacier Bay, and other wilderness areas.

Can you take a fifth wheel to Alaska? ›

All legal, road-worthy vehicles can drive to Alaska. Motorcycles, cars, trucks, and motorhomes, travel trailers, fifth wheels, and toy haulers can make the trip if they're in good working order.

How much does it cost to rent a motorhome in Alaska? ›

How much does it cost to rent an RV in Alaska? Motorhomes in Alaska average $200/night while towable trailers are around $120/night.

Is there a senior rate in Alaska ferry? ›

Alaska Ferry System, Juneau, AK

Ferries are the most efficient way to travel from island to island in this part of the state. Passengers 65 and older, who are traveling between points on the Alaska Marine Highway or Inside Passage, can enjoy discounted fares on the Alaska Ferry System.

What are the rainy months in Alaska? ›

Winter temperatures in Alaska range from 0°F / -18°C to -30°F / -35°C from November to March. Finally, while it can rain throughout Alaska's summer, May is often the driest month in Alaska and September is typically the wettest.

How long is a ferry ride from Seattle to Alaska? ›

Anchorage Routes

The average time to transport a vehicle ifrom Seattle to Anchorage is 9-11 days and to barge from Anchorage to Seattle is 12 to 14 days.

What month is the best time to visit Alaska? ›

The best time to visit Alaska is during the summer months. While our summer season is short, it is the driest, warmest time to visit. Starting mid May and ending mid September you are sure to see the best the State of Alaska has to offer...

What is the best time to drive to Alaska? ›

DRIVING THE ALASKA HIGHWAY IN WINTER

The best driving conditions, most hours of daylight, and most visitor services can be found on the Alaska Highway from May through September. However, visitors can have a fun and safe drive along the Alaska Highway year-round with a little extra caution and advance planning.

Do I need a passport to go to Alaska? ›

U.S. citizens flying between another state and Alaska do not need a passport. However, those driving through Canada or traveling on a ferry or cruise ship with stops in Canada are required to carry one.

Can I carry a gun in my RV into Canada? ›

Some RVers always have a firearm in their vehicle for safety concerns or hunting. Regardless of the reason, Canada has a zero-tolerance policy for anyone attempting to bring firearms or ammunition into the country without following proper procedures.

How do you cross the border on an RV? ›

To drive an RV across the Canada-U.S. border, you'll need: A valid passport or acceptable travel document for each person traveling with you. A driver's license (or another form of identification), a copy of your vehicle's registration, and proof of insurance.

How much does it cost to drive from Seattle to Alaska? ›

Road trip planner

The total cost of driving from Seattle, WA to Anchorage, AK (one-way) is $424.53 at current gas prices.

How much does it cost to camp in Alaska? ›

Formal campgrounds in Alaska can cost a minimum of $40. In some nicer parts of the state you might pay twice that amount during peak season. We found that most people who drive to Alaska do not plan to spend very much on camping.

Can you just camp anywhere in Alaska? ›

Tent camping, or sleeping in your car, is available all over the state of Alaska. An important note is that you can't just camp anywhere! You need to confirm that camping is allowed in the area you want to camp in. If you are in an established campground then you'll now for sure it's a place you can camp.

Where can I camp between Denali and Anchorage? ›

Mat-Su Valley RV Park and Campground: 1- 907-495-6300 Full service GoodSam RV Park and campground on Parks Highway between Anchorage and Denali National Park. Water, electric and sewer on all sites. Good Sam, laundry, showers, located on the Little Susitna River surrounded by excellent bank fishing.

Where can I park my RV for free near me? ›

How To Find Free Overnight RV Parking
  • Truck Stops. Truck stops are one of the most common places where you can park your RV for the night and get some rest without having to pay. ...
  • Walmart Parking Lots. ...
  • National Parks. ...
  • Big Box Stores. ...
  • BLM Land. ...
  • Backcountry Camping. ...
  • Dry Camping.
29 Oct 2020

Is it easy to camp in Alaska? ›

Alaska has so many fantastic camping opportunities that it can be overwhelming! As the most sparsely populated state in the country, there's plenty of room to spread out for a remote camping experience. Or, camp close to Anchorage for easy access to all the amenities and attractions Alaska's biggest city has to offer.

What should you not forget on an RV trip? ›

Table of Contents hide
  • 2.1 1. Basic Tool Box.
  • 2.2 2. RV Surge Protector.
  • 2.3 3. Water Pressure Regulator.
  • 2.4 4. Water Filter.
  • 2.5 5. Foldable Rake.
  • 2.6 6. Portable Air Compressor.
  • 2.7 7. Portable Speaker.
22 Oct 2021

What should you not pack in your RV? ›

What Not To Pack For Your RV Vacation
  • Canned food. Seriously, you'll never eat all the emergency supplies you're tempted to hoard in your RV. ...
  • Electronic items. This includes laptops, tablets and video game consoles. ...
  • Kitchen appliances. Keep your meals simple. ...
  • Fresh water. ...
  • Firewood.

What food should I bring on an RV trip? ›

Here is a list of some of our favorite foods to bring when camping:
  • Granola.
  • Cereal with milk.
  • Bagels, muffins, or other breakfast pastries.
  • Oatmeal.
  • Premade smoothies.
  • Fresh fruit.
  • Premade breakfast burritos.
  • Hard-boiled eggs.
24 May 2019

Can you use an RV bathroom while driving? ›

The good news is that you can use the RV bathroom while the vehicle is in motion. Because the electrical systems are in action while the car is on the road, you can use the bathroom and flush with the water pump as normal.

How cheap can you travel in an RV? ›

Best Ways to Save Money on an RV Road Trip
  1. Join RV Clubs. ...
  2. Travel Off-Season. ...
  3. Shop Around for Affordable RV Rentals. ...
  4. Save Money With RV Relocation Deals. ...
  5. Book Your RV Early. ...
  6. Only Rent Add-Ons You Need. ...
  7. RV Insurance Research. ...
  8. Plan Inexpensive Driving Routes.

Can you stop anywhere in a motorhome? ›

The feeling of freedom when picking up your motorhome is truly unique. Once those keys are in the ignition and the seatbelt is clicked in, you can go anywhere, at any time, stopping whenever you feel like it, and staying in each place as long as you choose. There really are no other forms of travel quite like it.

Is RV life the same as RV trip Wizard? ›

RV LIFE Trip Wizard is part of the RV LIFE Network. Founded in 1984, RV LIFE Magazine was acquired by Campground Reviews in 2013. RV LIFE Magazine is a venerable publication and is the authority for RVers and Campers.

Does RV trip Wizard include RV life? ›

Now, RV LIFE Trip Wizard users can navigate the trips they have planned in RV LIFE Trip Wizard. The RV GPS app on their mobile phone or other GPS enabled device is ready to help. Once downloaded from the app store (Apple or Android), simply sign in to the RV LIFE GPS & Campgrounds mobile app.

Is there a free RV GPS app? ›

Best Free RV Navigation App

Google Maps (Android and Apple) is by far the best free option out there. This app allows you to add stops, avoid tolls, and much more. That said, Google Maps was not made with big rigs in mind.

What is the meaning of Boondocking? ›

Sometimes referred to as “dry camping,” boondocking is any time you camp in your RV without water, sewer, or electrical connections. That can take the form of parking your rig deep in the backcountry or pulling over at a highway rest stop.

Is wild camping legal in Alaska? ›

Rules for Camping on Alaska State Trust Land

You may camp on the same campsite for no more than 14 days. The entire camp must be moved at least two miles before the end of the 14-day period. A cabin or other permanent improvement is not allowed.

Where are the boondocks in Anchorage? ›

Top Anchorage Dispersed Campgrounds
  • Porcupine Campground. ...
  • Eagle River Nature Center (public use cabins/yurts) ...
  • Bird Creek Campground - Chugach State Park. ...
  • NF FH-14 Pullout Dispersed - Chugach NF. ...
  • Girdwood Campground. ...
  • Eagle River Campground - Chugach State Park. ...
  • Coeur D'Alene Campground. ...
  • City of Whitter Campground - Whitter Bay.

Is Alaska RV friendly? ›

Alaska is one of the only places in the world where it's legal to pull over anywhere and RV boondock style. Highway pullouts, shoulders, and other areas off the road are prime spots for getting some sleep and prepping for the next day's travel.

Can you live in an RV in Alaska? ›

And yes, it's very difficult to dry out a waterlogged bed and couch inside a 95 square foot motorhome in the Alaskan winter, but it's possible. Living in your vehicle can actually be quite comfortable.

How long does it take to drive an RV to Alaska? ›

Reasons to ship your RV to Alaska

For most RVers, figure about 8-10 days of driving. Driving the fabled Alcan Highway is something a lot of RVers want to do at least once. There are lots of things to see and do along the route.

How much is it to rent an RV in Alaska for a week? ›

On average, you can expect to pay between $75 and $150 per night to rent most small trailers and campervans. Larger trailers and motorhomes could cost $100 to $250 per night. Renting an RV for a longer time can be even more affordable–a week or month-long rental could average out to less than $60 per day.

How much does it cost to rent an RV in Fairbanks Alaska? ›

RV rentals in Fairbanks can range between $75 and $150 per night for most small to moderately sized trailers and campervans. Larger RVs and travel trailers can cost from $100 to $250 per night, depending on the season and the RV's year, make, and model.

How much does it cost to rent a motorhome in Anchorage Alaska? ›

How much does it cost to rent an RV around Anchorage? Motorhomes around Anchorage average $200/night while towable trailers are around $120/night.

Can I drive my RV through Canada to Alaska? ›

RVs of all categories can all be driven to Alaska. No matter what camper you drive, you'll pass through Canada when driving to Alaska from the continental U.S. You'll need to keep in mind a few things while visiting our “neighbor to the north.”

Can you live in an RV in Alaska in the winter? ›

And yes, it's very difficult to dry out a waterlogged bed and couch inside a 95 square foot motorhome in the Alaskan winter, but it's possible. Living in your vehicle can actually be quite comfortable.

Can you Boondock in Alaska? ›

In fact, almost the entire state is open to boondocking. Most of the highways have pull-outs on them where boondocking is permitted, and Alaska 511 is your North Star to navigate these highways and potential road closures. The Last Frontier is by far the most boondocking friendly state in the union.

Is it easy to camp in Alaska? ›

Alaska has so many fantastic camping opportunities that it can be overwhelming! As the most sparsely populated state in the country, there's plenty of room to spread out for a remote camping experience. Or, camp close to Anchorage for easy access to all the amenities and attractions Alaska's biggest city has to offer.

Can I carry a gun in my RV into Canada? ›

Some RVers always have a firearm in their vehicle for safety concerns or hunting. Regardless of the reason, Canada has a zero-tolerance policy for anyone attempting to bring firearms or ammunition into the country without following proper procedures.

How do you cross the border on an RV? ›

To drive an RV across the Canada-U.S. border, you'll need: A valid passport or acceptable travel document for each person traveling with you. A driver's license (or another form of identification), a copy of your vehicle's registration, and proof of insurance.

How much does it cost to drive from Seattle to Alaska? ›

Road trip planner

The total cost of driving from Seattle, WA to Anchorage, AK (one-way) is $424.53 at current gas prices.

How cold is too cold for RV camping? ›

Extremely cold temperatures (anything that approaches -20°F to -30°F or lower) can cause serious damage to your RV. You run the risk of pipes freezing for sure, but you also run the risk of your engine simply not starting – or even turning over.

Where can I park my RV for free in Alaska? ›

Boondocking Sites in Alaska
  • Tustumena Lake Dispersed Camping Area. ...
  • Deadman Lake Campground. ...
  • Upper Trail Lake Pullout. ...
  • Susitna River Dispersed Camping Area. ...
  • Lower Skilak Lake Campground. ...
  • Kelly Lake Campground. ...
  • Galbraith Lake Campground. ...
  • Free Camping in Alaska.
4 Mar 2021

Is there free camping in Alaska? ›

Free National Forest Camping in Alaska

Over half of it–129 million acres–comes in the form of national forest. The two national forests in Alaska are also the largest in the nation, and they're full of dispersed camping if you can navigate the forest roads.

Can you camp on the side of the road in Alaska? ›

Roadside Tent Camping in Alaska

Alaska law permits limited camping to to accommodate these special outdoor recreational styles. Pitching tents next to Alaska's roadsides can best be done in one of the supplied roadside rest areas or at any wide pullouts.

How much does it cost to camp in Alaska? ›

Formal campgrounds in Alaska can cost a minimum of $40. In some nicer parts of the state you might pay twice that amount during peak season. We found that most people who drive to Alaska do not plan to spend very much on camping.

Is wild camping legal in Alaska? ›

Rules for Camping on Alaska State Trust Land

You may camp on the same campsite for no more than 14 days. The entire camp must be moved at least two miles before the end of the 14-day period. A cabin or other permanent improvement is not allowed.

Videos

1. Alaska RV Vacation: The Best Way to Explore Alaska
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2. 🏆 Top 10 Must See National Parks with Your RV!
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3. 10 things you need know for traveling to Alaska by RV
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4. What to Pack on your trip to Alaska: Our top 10 Tips!
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5. BEST CAMPING LOCATION, ALASKA EDITION: EPISODE 1
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6. RVING THE ALASKA HIGHWAY (EASIER THAN WE THOUGHT)
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