How Is The Cabela'S Alaskan Guide Tent For Winter Camping - Welcome to Tamborine Mountain Caravan Camping (2022)

Cabela’s Alaskan Guide Reviews – Trailspace

Review of the Alaskan Guide (Cabelas) 4-man TentI acquired this four-person tent for a number of important reasons. Primary considerations were that it be a robust tent that could endure moderately high wind gusts, rain, and snow while remaining durable over time, and that it be constructed as a four-season tent while being readily transportable. I like the 6 man model because of the increased room it provides; nevertheless, the four guy form is perfect for canoe camping and other similar activities.

With its outstanding six-pole construction (I highly recommend the aluminum upgrade), the Tent is extremely robust, and it is capable of supporting 1 litre water bottles in each of the four holders without drooping or straining the tent structure.

The ceiling height is well than acceptable for a tent of this size; despite my 6’6″ height, I never once bumped my head on the LED bulb in the gear loft when using the tent “This is something I’m picky about.

The stake straps are quite effective, but setting up this tent is not a one-person job since you will need an additional person to hold the first pole over the anchor pin and offer some support so that the pole does not over bend and fail.

  • The tub floor has been thoughtfully designed, and the materials used are of high quality.
  • To give you an idea of how big it is, it’s about the same size as a bikini bottom.
  • There is room for improvement.
  • While these stakes are superior than most, you may give them to your cousin and replace them with a pair of 12 inch steel spikes.
  • Steel spikes are the most common form of spike for every sort of ground; you can’t go wrong with them, but they are heavier.
  • I’ll be looking about for a more suitable alternative.
  • The Fly is a kind of insect.
  • For starters, the fly is far too short for a four-season tent of this kind.
  • Furthermore, you may open both doors in warm weather to let in some fresh air, and you can always open the well-designed three-section vestibule for additional ventilation when needed.

The distance between the ground and the tent is approximately 8 feet “as well as possibly a little more in the vestibule area A significant amount of snow would be required to lessen the drafts, and you would be unable to keep anything on the inside margins of the vestibule without it being wet in rainy circumstances as a result of this.

Although it is ridiculously small (on the tested four-person model) and almost unusable for any day-to-day activity other than a small amount of storage, it would be fantastically effective if it were extended out another two feet or so and included the adjustable awning poles I previously mentioned.

  • The fly is equipped with two brass hooks on shock cording at each anchor point, and these will certainly drive you insane if you don’t pay attention.
  • When you fling the fly over the tent and attempt to arrange it, they latch onto every pole, loop, and possible protrusion, making this process a pain and requiring you to circle your tent incessantly just to get the fly in place, which is time-consuming and frustrating.
  • This is simply plain stupid, to be honest.
  • I pulled the eyelets from the fly and reinstalled them on the rings attached to the thick gauge nylon floor straps that I had used for staking out the tent after opening the eyelets.
  • In addition, you’ll want to secure the velcro loops sewed on the bottom of the fly (which are used to wrap around the tent poles during storms) because they like to catch on things.
  • Vent Windows are always open to provide for proper ventilation.
  • Any amount of wind appears to be able to simply pass through the fly and through these vent ports.

Please excuse me, but I was under the impression that this was a four-season tent.

I didn’t have much spare time between travels, and I didn’t want to get myself into a sewing bee, so I skipped it.

Nighttime temps were just above freezing during a recent overnight test, and presto!

Despite the cold, my heater was able to keep the tent nice and warm.

Problem addressed, and I can easily remove any of the coverings if necessary without exerting too much effort.

ConclusionI am shocked that this tent has been around for a number of years and yet it has so many severe and easily solved design defects, especially considering how inexpensive it is.

The fly, on the other hand, is something you’ll have to put up with until a redesign is finalized and implemented.

I’d even be prepared to pay for mine if it were that much required.

If given the opportunity, I would be delighted to write another review that incorporated some of these adjustments. I am confident that the outcome would be a 5 Star rating without a doubt. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

How Is The Cabela’s Alaskan Guide Tent For Winter Camping

A Review of the Alaskan Guide (Cabela’s) 4-Man TentI acquired this four-person tent for a number of important reasons. Primary considerations were that it be a robust tent that could handle moderately high wind gusts, rain, and snow while remaining durable over time, and that it be built to be a four-season tent while being conveniently portable. I like the 6 man model because of the increased room it provides; nevertheless, the four man tent is perfect for canoe camping and other similar activities.

  1. Fully stretched and precisely stitched panels, together with the six pole design, result in walls that are reasonably straight and close to vertical, giving the impression of a large amount of space, even in the four man version.
  2. Because of its hexagonal shape, it is simple to put up for wilderness camping, and the three-section vestibule is a beautiful design; however, it would be even better if it were a little longer and had two movable poles to provide for awning arrangement flexibility.
  3. One worker may easily complete the setup when the first pole is in place.
  4. Although it is a little cramped, the gear loft serves its purpose.
  5. Ideally, I’d like to be able to put more than a pack of matches up there, and I’ll most likely build a larger one because my LED bulb had a bad history of falling out every now and again.
  6. You may give these stakes to your cousin and replace them with a set of 12 inch steel spikes, which will be better than most.
  7. In any sort of terrain, steel spikes are the most prominent, and you can’t go wrong with them, but they are heavier.
  8. My search for a better solution will continue.
  9. Insects called “flies.” There are a number of areas in the home that may need a facelift.
  10. However, although this is beneficial in terms of minimizing condensation and boosting air flow during warmer weather, there is simply too much air moving beneath the fly in lower temperatures.

If the weather is cold enough in the winter to pack snow around most of the base of the fly (please keep in mind that there must be some open space around a significant area of the fly to ensure adequate ventilation), it becomes a real problem when you need to protect your boots and bags in the vestibule area when it is raining.

A significant amount of snow would be required to lessen the drafts, and you would be unable to keep anything on the inside margins of the vestibule without it being wet in rainy circumstances as a result of the situation.

The awning is ridiculously small (on the tested four-person model) and almost unusable for any day-to-day activity other than a small amount of storage, but it would be fantastically effective if it were extended out another two feet or so and included the adjustable awning poles that I mentioned earlier.

  1. You will go insane trying to tie this fly since it has two brass hooks on shock cording at each anchor point, and they are very necessary.
  2. The moment you throw the fly over the canvas and attempt to arrange it, they latch onto every pole, loop, and possible projection, making this operation an awful nightmare and requiring you to circle the tent incessantly just to get the fly in position.
  3. The fact that you’re reading this shows how stupid you really are.
  4. I withdrew the eyelets from the fly and reinstalled them on the rings attached to the thick gauge nylon floor straps that I had used for staking down the tent before opening the eyelets again.
  5. In addition, you’ll want to secure the velcro loops sewed on the bottom of the fly (which are used to wrap around the tent poles during storms) because they like to catch on things as well.
  6. There will be no more giggling from campers in the vicinity.
  7. We were chilly in the tent even with the doors and windows zipped up tight and our jackets on during a recent Rocky Mountain vacation, thanks to three enormous mesh windows in the tent ceiling that let in a lot of cool mountain air.
  8. Because the heat was simply swamped by the frigid air, using a heater was a frustrating exercise.
  9. While you have two doors and three zip windows to work with in hot weather, when it’s chilly, you have practically no control over the amount of air that gets into the tent!

My solution for a lead-user was to purchase several yards of cross weave 10mm white vinyl sheet from my local tarp manufacturer and cut it into three triangular shapes that were slightly larger than the vent windows so that tent clips could slip through the small slits I cut and hold the covers in place over the vent windows even when the tent was being stowed.

  • No more chilly winds blowing over our shoulders and down our necks.
  • Meanwhile, we were able to get adequate fresh air overnight by just opening two zipped windows a modest amount each night.
  • I would like to see this as an incorporated feature because they could simply be attached with velcro from the inside and be simple to install and remove on my own whenever I need them to.
  • Despite the fact that it is well-made and well-assembled, there are too many evident flaws that need adjustment and/or more work in order to enjoy a genuinely pleasant camping trip.
  • In fact, I’d be happy to pay for my own if it were truly necessary.

Please allow me to submit another review with some of these modifications if given the opportunity. And I’m confident that the outcome would be a unanimous 5 Star rating. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Are Cabela’s tents any good?

Overall, the Cabela’s West Wind Dome Tent is a fantastic 3-season tent that is built to endure severe winds and downpours while remaining lightweight (the material is 100 percent nylon taffeta with a 1,500mm waterproof rating). The Cabela’s West Wind Dome Tent is a high-quality tent with a plethora of beneficial features that can be purchased for a reasonable price (C$249).

Who makes Cabela’s Alaskan Guide scopes?

Previously, the Alaskan Guide line was manufactured in Japan, while the remainder of the line was manufactured in China. After a while, part of the lines were diverted to the Philippines. All Cabela’s branded scopes are currently labeled as “Made in China,” or at least they were until a couple of weeks ago.

Are Athlon Optics any good?

The optical clarity, general quality, and operating controls of every Athlon scope I’ve purchased so far have been rather impressive when compared to the pricing of those scopes.

Is Leupold better than vortex?

Leupold may have a little advantage in terms of the quality of their scopes’ construction, whilst Vortex has a slight advantage in terms of pricing. Despite Vortex’s relative inexperience, both companies have earned outstanding reputations in the industry. Finally, if you’re in the market for a scope, your decision will likely come down to a matter of personal taste.

Are Pentax rifle scopes still manufactured?

The Asahi Optical Corporation, Ltd. was established in 1938 when the company changed its name. There are a variety of sports equipment manufactured by Pentax today. These devices range from binoculars to spotting and riflescopes.

Are Athlon Argos scopes any good?

It is strongly recommended that you get the Athlon Argos BTR 6-24-50 if you are just getting started in long-range shooting. With the exception of the limited eye relief and a modest drop in clarity/brightness at high magnifications, it has the following features: This is a fantastic glass. Construction that is long-lasting.

See also: Persona 4 What To Tell Kanji In Tent

Are vortex scopes as good as Leupold?

The Vortex scope outperforms the Leupold scope solely when it comes to field of view (FOV). Its eye relief, tube filling, and reticle are all exceptional, making the Leupold VX-3i 3.5-10×50 a top scope in these areas.

Which vortex scopes are FFP?

Which vortex scopes have the first focal plane as their focal plane? Model of the Scope of Work Options for the Reticle Diamondback Tactical Reticle with Illuminated Reticle 4-16-44 FFP is an abbreviation for Fourteen Sixty-Fourty-Fourty-Fifty-Fourty-Fifty-Fifty-Fifty-Fifty-Fifty-Fifty-Fifty-Fifty-Fifty-Fifty-Fifty-Fifty-Fifty-Fifty-Fifty-Fifty-Fifty-Fifty-Fifty-Fifty-Fifty-Fifty-Fifty-Fifty-Fifty-F MOA for the EBR-2C MRAD EBR-2C EBR-2C MRAD EBR-2C MRAD There will be no Diamondback Tactical.

6-24-50 FFP is an abbreviation for 6-24-50 FFP.

5-25-56 FFP is a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of a fraction EBR-7C MOA EBR-7C MRAD EBR-7C MOA Yes Viper PST Gen II 2-1032 FFP (Full Force Protection) EBR-4 MOA EBR-4 MRAD EBR-4 MRAD Yes

Are scopes made in China any good?

In contemporary days and times, optics created in China are of a high quality. They aren’t as nice as European or American-made scopes, but some of them are remarkably outstanding for their price range. A $50 3–9 scope will not last as long as a Nightforce, for example. Furthermore, the clarity of the glass will be diminished, and the vehicle will not track as effectively as it once did.

Who makes Vortex scopes?

Vortex OpticsType Corporation is a corporation that specializes in optical technology. Founded in Middleton, Wisconsin in 2004, by Founder Daniel C. Hamilton, with headquarters in Barneveld, Wisconsin, USA. Precision optical equipment such as binoculars, spotting scopes, riflescopes, and other similar devices.

Where are vortex scopes made?

Although the company’s headquarters are in Wisconsin, the riflescopes they sell are manufactured in one of three countries: Japan, the Philippines, or China, depending on the model line. At the moment, Vortex markets four unique riflescope product lines: the least priced are Chinese-made Crossfire scopes, which are the least expensive of the four.

Does cabelas price match guns?

COMPARISON PRICES ARE HIGHLIGHTED The product you seek to purchase from us is currently available and identical to the product now provided at a lower price by another retailer’s local store or on a qualifying website, and we will sell you the product at that lower price if we are able to verify this with the other retailer.

Where are Athlon scopes built?

The high-end Athlon scopes are manufactured in Japan at the LOW plant, which is also where practically all high-end optics manufactured in Japan are produced.

Are Athlon scopes made in China?

In Japan, the high-end Athlon scopes are manufactured in the LOW facility, which is also where the vast majority of high-end made in Japan optics are manufactured.

Do Pentax binoculars have a lifetime warranty?

The Pentax Optics Limited Lifetime Warranty ensures that every Pentax Optics product is free of faults in material and workmanship for the lifetime of the owner.

Does cabelas mount scopes for free?

For example, Cabela’s will mount and bore site my scope for no charge, however TJ’s will mount and collimate my scope for $50.00 (I have no idea what collimate is).

Are Burris scopes made in the USA?

Despite the fact that not every Burris product is manufactured in the United States, every product tested and inspected in the 8th Street facility.

Is Monstrum a good brand?

Monstrum Tactical is a tactical gear and equipment company that operates throughout the United States, providing some of the greatest pricing in the industry. While concentrating on cutting-edge design, the company is also committed to keeping their items within reach of the general public.

Are any vortex scopes made in USA?

Unfortunately, the only Vortex scope model now available that is manufactured in the United States is their top-of-the-line Razer HD AMG scope, which costs around $2000.

Are Cabela’s scopes made by Vortex?

According to what I’ve read, LOW and Meopta are two of the businesses that have produced the scopes for Cabela’s. Vortex produces a single scope model. They outsource the production of the remaining 99 models they offer.

Does Cabela’s Mount Scopes?

If you purchase a rifle with mounts and a scope from a Cabela’s Retail Store and request that the scope be installed and bore-sighted, that service is available at no additional charge, subject to availability of the service personnel.

Does Bass Pro Shop Mount Scopes?

Is bass pro similar cabelas in that they provide free installation and bore sight? Yes, that’s correct.

What scopes are not made in China?

Meopta, Zeiss, Kahles, Swaro, S B Nightforce, and Trijicon are among the brands that are not made in China.

Is Monstrum a good rifle scope?

The Monstrum Tactical 6-24x50mm G3 is a First-Focal Plane scope with some outstanding features for a scope in the sub-$300 price range. the pricing range is as follows: Price is excellent ($250 on Amazon as of the time of writing this post). Exceptional optical clarity.

Which Athlon scopes are made in Japan?

The Cronus and Cronus BTR scopes are manufactured in Japan using only the highest-quality materials and components. If you’re searching for the highest level of construction quality and clarity, this is the Athlon selection for you to consider. In addition to this, every other scope in Athlon’s current lineup is manufactured in China.

Are vortex scopes worth the money?

Vortex is widely regarded as one of the world’s leading makers of high-performance optics. Thus, Vortex scopes may be acquired at a reasonable cost and maintained at a reasonable cost. The majority of their scopes offer excellent value for money.

Cabela’s Alaskan Guide 6-person Tent Review

In recent testing, the Gear Guys discovered the Alaskan Guide series tent from Cabela’s and were really pleased with the quality and performance of the product. We put the tent through its paces after getting three days of rain, followed by a fast freeze that resulted in two inches of snow and a temperature of 18 degrees throughout the testing period. The space around the door vent and roof vent is seen in the front image. “data-medium-file=” data-large-file=” data-small-file=” src=” alt=”” width=”609″ height=”341″ srcset=” h=341 607w, h=682 1214w, h=84 150w, h=169 300w, h=575 1024w” sizes=”(max-width: 609px) 100vw, 609px” alt=”” width=”609″ height=”341″ “> The following is an example of a formalized formalized formalized The door vent and roof vent area are visible in the front perspective.

  • Use in all four seasons
  • D-frame construction for strength
  • Integrated vestibule that shields the entry and serves as a storage area for gear
  • Poles made of fiberglass with shock cords
  • Polyethylene floor with corner clips for an optional clip-in place floor liner
  • Abrasion-resistant polyester floor
  • Fly made of polyester ripstop (waterproof rating of 2000 mm thick)
  • Floor having a waterproof rating of 3000 mm in thickness
  • YKK zippers are used. Floor dimensions: 10’8″ x 11’9″ Height: 6’3″
  • Weight: 32 pounds
  • Center height: 6’3″

As a result of acquiring and testing the KeltyDiscovery 4 Tent and discovering that the tent had a significant moisture problem when temperatures dropped below 40 degrees Fahrenheit, we began looking for a winter-specific tent to use on winter trips. We discovered the Alaskan Guide 6-person tent set-up for exhibition at Cabela’s and were immediately pleased by the center height and integrated vestibule, which allows us to store goods outside the tent while also keeping it clean and dry while also keeping it clean and dry.

  1. As a result of reviewing customer evaluations, one of the most common complaints about this tent was the amount of time and effort it took to set it up by yourself.
  2. If you purchase this tent, however, the likelihood are that you will have at least one other person with you when you put it up, and while build-up is fairly efficient with two people, it is still time-consuming.
  3. When bending and elevating the fiberglass poles to reach the mounting pins, it is important not to put too much strain on the fiberglass poles.
  4. This allows the other person to rapidly move around the tent and secure the pole ends into the mounting pins while the first person is still working.
  5. The robustness of this tent, as well as its capacity to withstand severe winds and snow loads, have been praised in other online customer evaluations.
  6. The Gear Guys spend a lot of time camping in cold weather, and waking up to damp gear in the morning from a poorly ventilated tent is really inconvenient.
  7. Despite the fact that we have not had an opportunity to test the tent in severe rain, many of the reviews from those who have done so have said that the tent keeps water out even in the most intense storms.
  8. The disadvantage of this tent is that it requires a significant amount of effort to set up, but if your journey will last many days, it will be well worth the effort.

src=” alt=””> Morning view of a rain-fly that effectively kept freezing rain and snow out while venting moisture” data medium file=” data large file=” src=” alt=””> Morning view of a rain-fly that effectively kept freezing rain and snow out while venting moisture” data large file=” data medium file=” src=” alt=””> Side view displaying the second door zipper at the left rear” data-medium-file=” data-large-file=” src=” alt=””> Side view showing the second door zipper at the left rear” data-large-file=” src=” alt=””> Side view showing the second door zipper at the left rear Elastic cable with hooks for the rain fly and adjustable webbing for optimal pole tension are both included.

There is adjustable webbing for the correct tension of the poles, as well as an elastic cord with hooks for the rain fly.

This tent has a rating of 4 stars from us (out of 5).

Cabelas Alaskan Guide tent?

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JP100

Hello there, folks. Any feedback on the Alaskan Guide tents sold by Cabela’s would be very appreciated. I’ve only used one once on a moose hunt, and it seemed to work well, but the weather was perfect for the hunt, so I didn’t get to put it through its paces. They appear to be a decent, inexpensive base camp alternative? Thanks In the past 20 years, I’ve had their prior version of this tent (the 6-man with fiberglass poles) in my possession. Because it’s so large and heavy, it’s a pain to set up by yourself (my wall tent is much quicker), and there’s not much space inside when you use cots.

  • The condensation in the item, on the other hand, was horrendous.
  • They used to sell an optional, extra-large vestibule that was available for the 6 man with aluminum poles, which I have.
  • The fact that they are heavy and difficult to set up on your own is offset by the fact that they perform exceptionally effectively in windy or wet weather.
  • Tapatalk was used to send this message from my iPhone.

The aluminum poles are well worth the money because they are more resistant to wind damage (very wind resistant tent for the sizeof it.) After 15 or so years of usage, our original one was finally starting to show signs of deterioration in the fly due to UV exposure, which was particularly noticeable at higher elevations in Colorado.

  1. We cook in the vestibule, which is an ancient huge style entryway.
  2. It is necessary to run the inside triangle “windows” down and away from the structure in order for it to air, as is the case with the top panel.
  3. There is no floor in it, only a tarp, so there will be no problems with the dripping.
  4. There are six poles and a significant number of stakes, so it will take some time, especially with the enormous old-style vestibule in front of them.
  5. Wishing you the best of success with your tent choices!

JP100

Thank you so much, everyone.

It appears to be a good fit for what I’m looking for. A lot of tent for a relatively small investment. Thanks

jmez

Vielen Dank, everyone. It appears to be a good fit for what I’m looking for. Not much money spent for an impressive amount of tents! Thanks

Trr15

Joined on February 16, 2014Messages 1,467Location Pennsylvania, Wyoming, Texas I’ve had an 8-man tent in Wyoming for the past 8-9 years that I’ve utilized as a basecamp. I chose with the fiberglass poles because they were less expensive. It’s huge and cumbersome, but gosh, it’s a fantastic tent. It hasn’t gotten much rain (although I did have to ride out a storm with quarter-sized hail), but it has been subjected to incredibly strong gusts and has handled it all with grace and dignity. It’s a fantastic tent, especially considering the price.

  1. This is an excellent tent for basecamp.
  2. I used fiberglass poles, which were heavier than aluminum poles, but they were able to withstand the weather conditions.
  3. An example of one that survived in extreme weather may be found on YouTube, courtesy of two Alaskan men (I believe).
  4. Setup is a pain in the arse at first, but after you get the hang of it, it becomes significantly less difficult.
  5. Purchase the floor liner as well.
  6. Wishing you the best of luck Tapatalk was used to send this message from my iPhone.
  7. Weather conditions were terrible, with strong gusts and persistent rain.

The same thing happened here in Kodiak, except a buddy of mine adapted it by running a stove pipe through the tent/tarp, and we were able to enjoy a cozy wood stove inside.

They are cumbersome, and as my children grew bigger, the tent appeared to get more smaller.

It’s certainly not a back pack tent, but if you stake out all of the guy ropes, it could be able to withstand a cyclone and keep you dry in the meantime.

I purchased an 8-man pack, which was a bit excessive considering I normally hunt alone.

It was far less difficult to set up on my own!

I used a tiny Mr.

Excellent tents.

There will be no condensation difficulties, there will be plenty of ventilation choices, and the tent will be robust.

Depending on the time of year we went, we would get significant winds that would come down through the valley and really blow, one night being so bad that nearly all of the other tents were sacked, literally tearing tents apart and breaking poles on about half of the girls tents because they were exposed and in the front line of wind direction.

I chose to stay in my tent because I was in a sheltered place and so didn’t feel the full force of the wind.

The best part was that I didn’t even have the thing guyed up; it was just a simple set up with poles and that was plenty for me.

Tent that stands up against the elements.

Use this product several times in less demanding weather and it has always performed well, with no condensation difficulties.

Similar threads

LocationPA/WY/TXI joined on February 16, 2014 and has 1,467 messages. Since 2008 or 2009, I’ve been using an 8-man tent as a basecamp in Wyoming. With the fiberglass poles, I was able to save a few bucks. While the tent is cumbersome as all get-out, man, it is a fantastic structure. Despite the fact that it hasn’t gotten much rain (although I did have to ride out a storm with quarter-sized hail), it has been subjected to exceptionally strong winds and has handled everything with grace and ease.

  • Ten years have passed since I purchased one (8 man version).
  • When I was hunting elk in Colorado, I used it on multiple occasions.
  • Simply vent correctly, as described above, and there will be no condensation.
  • As a result, it persuaded me to make the purchase.
  • It’s definitely worth it.
  • The decision will be beneficial to you in the long run.
  • Date of JoinedFeb 11, 2019Messages47Place of ResidenceAlaska When I visited Alaska late last September, I stayed there for a total of two weeks.

Shelter in plenty.

Joined on October 18, 2014Messages8 Messages From Arizona to Alaska, I’ve been using a 6 guy on family travels for the past 15 years with no issues.

88 messages since joining on September 14th, 2019.

It’s certainly not a back pack tent, but if you stake out all of the guy ropes, it could be able to withstand a storm and keep you dry in the meantime.

It was a bit much for me to buy an 8 guy because I often hunt alone.

Getting everything set up on my own was far less difficult!

First thing in the morning and before night, I utilized a tiny Mr.

Tents of exceptional quality.

Condensation is not an issue, and there are several ventilation choices in this durable tent.

My daughter and many other girls slept in it while on a school vacation to Big Bend National Park in Texas.

Despite the fact that I didn’t get up, a large number of fathers were out protecting their daughters and friends.

There was a lot of discussion about “this one tent wasn’t even moving” the next morning when the damage was being assessed, as well as “who brought that tent.” It was the cabelas alaskan guide with fiberglass poles, not even the stronger grade aluminum poles, that did the trick.

My daughter reported that the wall that the wind was striking would occasionally bow in a bit, but that it was never in the mood to consider falling down completely.

Many additional times in less trying weather, and it has performed admirably, with no condensation concerns to speak of.

  • Outdoor enthusiasts will appreciate this ultra-rugged, four-season tent. Built to resist the most harsh circumstances found in nature – and field tested in Alaska – Extreamly stable – modern design and robust frame comprised of seven shock-corded fiberglass poles provide an extremely solid structure. Waterproof rainfly made of durable 75-denier polyester ripstop fabric with a 2,000mm polyurethane covering that keeps out rain and snow
  • Protection for gear storage and entrance is provided by an integrated vestibule. Tent body is made of 210-denier polyester oxford
  • It has three mesh roof vents and two D-style windows for ventilation. Bathtub-style floor made of 210-denier polyester oxford with an extra-thick 3,000mm-rated covering
  • Abrasion-resistant carpeting
  • Guy line loops that have been reinforced YKK zippers in the numbers 8 and 10 provide a smooth operation throughout. Several panels and compartments for storing equipment
  • It comes with twenty-four metal stakes, sixteen tie downs, two ounces of seam sealant, and a repair kit.

More information may be found here. 100154322 is the web ID for this page.

Cabela’s Alaskan Guide 6 Person Geodesic Tent

When traveling in my Rubicon, I’m looking for a tent to utilize as an additional sleeping space. The interior height and features of the Cabela’s Alaskan Guide 6 Person Geodesic Tent appeal to me, but I’ve read a couple of reviews that indicate that it is difficult to impossible to set up by one person. I intend to sleep on cots in order to save money. I had been considering The North Face Mountain 25 tent, but it would not enable me to stand up comfortably, and I would most likely wind up sleeping on a mattress in that situation.

  • Is there anyone who has had any experience in this area that they would be willing to share?
  • The only difference is that the door is on the long side, which is more to my liking than the short side.
  • It’s a fantastic option for a bombproof 2-person bunker, and I strongly suggest it.
  • I was able to get a Halo 6 for less than $425.

Cabela’s Alaskan Guide Model Geodesic 4-Person Tent

Orders must be placed by 4 p.m. E.T. for the purpose of delivery Size: 9’5″L x 8’W x 4’8″HColor: Green/Gray Dimensions: 9’5″L x 8’W x 4’8″HColor: Green/Gray 4-Person Capacity Select All of Your Alternatives Please see the table above for availability. Incredibly durable and engineered to resist nature’s most extreme circumstances, the Cabela’s® Alaskan Guide Model® Geodesic 4-Person Tent provides full four-season protection in a time-tested and field-proven classic design. The tent’s state-of-the-art geodesic form, innovative 7-pole system, and durable materials are designed to withstand severe winds that would otherwise destroy weaker tents, providing outdoorsmen with the benefits of 25 years of Alaskan field testing and upgrades.

  • This full-coverage rainfly also serves as an integrated vestibule, providing you with covered storage space for your belongings as well as protected access into the tent through the D-style door.
  • The Alaskan Guide Model is available in two sizes.
  • Smooth-operating No.
  • 10 YKK® zippers are used throughout the tent, ensuring a smooth-operating experience you can rely upon.

Guy line loops that have been reinforced for strength and extended life. Includes 24 aluminum stakes, 16 tie downs, 2 oz. seam sealant, and a repair kit to get you started. The dimensions of the package are 30″ x 10″ x 8″. Weight to be transported: 24 lbs. 11 oz. Imported.

  • Outdoor enthusiasts will appreciate this ultra-rugged, four-season tent. Built to resist the most harsh circumstances found in nature – and field tested in Alaska – Extreamly stable – modern design and robust frame comprised of seven shock-corded fiberglass poles provide an extremely solid structure. The rainfly is made of durable 75-denier polyester ripstop with a 2,000mm polyurethane waterproof covering that keeps out rain and snow. Protection for gear storage and entrance is provided by an integrated vestibule. Tent body is made of 210-denier polyester oxford
  • It has three mesh roof vents and two D-style windows for ventilation. Bathtub-style floor made of 210-denier polyester oxford with an extra-thick 3,000mm-rated covering
  • Abrasion-resistant carpeting
  • Guy line loops that have been reinforced YKK zippers in the numbers 8 and 10 provide a smooth operation throughout. Several panels and compartments for storing equipment
  • It comes with twenty-four metal stakes, sixteen tie downs, two ounces of seam sealant, and a repair kit.

Web ID 100102896.

Cabela’s Alaskan Guide Tent Review –

Anyone who has gone on a weekend vacation or a longer out-of-state journey understands how important it is to have a high-quality tent with them. Despite the fact that an RV is desirable, they are not always feasible. Having a high-quality tent is essential for staying dry, warm, and comfortable when camping. The last thing you want is to be unpleasant or have to cut short a trip due to a tent breakdown. However, this is exactly what might happen. Having purchased and used several tents over the years, this post is an honest assessment of the Cabela’s 6-Person Alaskan Guide Tent, which I have owned for two years and have thoroughly enjoyed.

Height 6’ 3”
Length 10’ 8”
Width 10’ 8”
Packed Size 31” x 9” x 10.6”
Weight 33 pounds

Overview of the Product

  • Built to endure nature’s most harsh circumstances — field tested in Alaska – this ultra-rugged 4-season garment is perfect for any occasion. Made of seven shock-corded fiberglass poles, this structure is extremely stable, has cutting-edge design, and is extremely sturdy. This durable, 75D polyester ripstop rainfly is protected from rain and snow with a 2,000mm PU waterproof covering. Integrated vestibule for storing and entering items in a safe environment
  • 210D polyester oxford tent body with three mesh roof vents and two D-style windows for ventilation
  • Lightweight and durable. Bathtub-style floor made of 210D polyester oxford with an extra-thick 3,000mm-rated coating
  • Abrasion-resistant floor made of 210D polyester oxford with an extra-thick 3,000mm-rated coating
  • Guy line loops that have been reinforced YKK® zippers in the numbers 8 and 10 provide a smooth operation throughout. Several panels and compartments for storing equipment
  • It comes with twenty-four metal stakes, sixteen tie downs, two ounces of seam sealant, and a repair kit.

Experiment in the Field Since purchasing the Cabela’s 6-Person Alaskan Guide Tent for myself two years ago, I’ve used it on countless camping excursions as well as two week-long deer hunts in Southern Illinois on public lands in November. The following are some of my key takeaways: Durability– The first thing I noticed about this tent was the thickness and durability of the walls, ceiling, and rainfly, which I thought was a great feature. When the tent is put up, you can see it is made of high-quality materials.

In addition, the floor has been strengthened with extra material to increase its longevity and thicken it.

This liner connects to loops in each corner of the tent, making it simple to put up, take down, and clean the tent.

See also: How Much Yield 2X2 Tent

There is a bundle of long heavy-duty pegs included with the Alaskan Guide tent to ensure that the tent does not move while in use.

This helps it stand out from the crowd.

When compared to a standard square or rectangular tent, the geodesic design provides significantly more inside space, providing for plenty of area for cots (such as Cabela’s Alaskan Guide Cot), a big air mattress, clothes, and other supplies.

The vestibule space at the entrance of the Alaskan Guide tent is another feature that makes it a worthwhile investment.

The boot rack is a fantastic place to store boots and other belongings, which frees up more space within the house.

I chose the 6-person model over the 4-person model because the middle height allows me to stand up more comfortably than the 4-person model, and the 8-person model appeared to be a little too large for my needs.

For ventilation, the Alaskan Guide tent features a few small built-in mesh vents in the ceiling, which is unlike other budget tents, which have mesh walls beneath the rain cover to save money.

Heater Portable Buddy Heat in this tent throughout the night in frigid weather and it has remained nice and toasty inside while still being able to properly vent out the roof.

This tent also stands up well in the wind, with the walls rarely moving even when the tent is entirely staked down.

The rain flap opens on both sides with a zipper, and the internal windows may be pulled down to allow for increased circulation and to chill the interior if necessary.

In comparison to previous tents I’ve used, this one keeps me entirely dry all of the time.

When it rains lightly to moderately, water droplets condense on the rain fly and flow down it.

When I put up my tent, I place a heavy-duty tarp below it to provide additional moisture protection.

One of the primary factors in my decision to acquire this tent was the ability to keep dry when camping.

In the evenings, I put a tiny light up there to illuminate the entire tent space.

For additional storage and organizing possibilities, the tent comes with one huge removable storage compartment that can be placed on the wall for enhanced convenience.

This is due to the fact that there are more poles, straps, and stakes to erect than with a standard camping tent.

I would much rather spend the few extra minutes it takes to set up a high-quality tent than to save a few dollars.

Certainly, it was more expensive than I had anticipated spending on a tent at the time, but I’ve been absolutely delighted with my decision to purchase it.

This tent has been in pristine condition for the past two years, and there are no indications of wear or tear on its outside.

This tent comes highly recommended by me for any hunter or serious outdoorsman searching for a high-quality product, as you can see from the review above. Check out some of the other entries from Bowhunting Depot for relevant information!

cabelas alaskan guide 4 person tent

cabelas alaskan guide 4 person tent606847701/20/12
OPCampfire RangerJoined:Dec 2011Posts: 1,693 Just wondering if any of you have used this tent I’m looking for a tent that would be suitable for camping in the summer and during antelope season in Wyoming. The reviews are really good from cabelas just thought I would try to get some opinions from some of you.
Re: cabelas alaskan guide 4 person tent606860501/20/12
Joined:Jan 2012Posts: 1,853Field_HandCampfire Ranger
Campfire RangerJoined:Jan 2012Posts: 1,853 i bought the cabelas deluxe backwood tent. it’s good for the family camping trips.

My idea of being organic is taking a dump in the woods.

Re: cabelas alaskan guide 4 person tent606869901/20/12
Joined:Nov 2007Posts: 7,453T_O_MCampfire Tracker
Campfire TrackerJoined:Nov 2007Posts: 7,453 is this the “XWT”?If so, a friend has one.Great tent once its up but a real workout for one guy to set up alone.Tom

Anyone who thinks there’s two sides to everything hasn’t met a M�bius strip.Here be dragons.

Re: cabelas alaskan guide 4 person tent606879301/20/12
Joined:Feb 2006Posts: 161bwortmanMember
MemberJoined:Feb 2006Posts: 161 The alaskan guide is a great tent.I would spend the extra $ and get the 8 man though.(no need to spend the extra $ on the aluminum poles in my opinion)It will be VERY warm inside if it is in the sun even if you have the windows open.(if the wind is blowing, you probably won’t want the windows open because it could fill with sand (even with the screens)If you don’t have shade from trees, I would recommend bringing one of those pop up sun shades like an EZ-UP.You will not be able to be inside the alaskan guide tent in the daytime if it is in the sun.(unless you are into sweat lodges)
Re: cabelas alaskan guide 4 person tent606887501/20/12
Joined:Apr 2008Posts: 3,745alaska_lancheCampfire Guide
Campfire GuideJoined:Apr 2008Posts: 3,745 I have had the 6 man version for 6 years now. Probably have about 100 nights in that tent. I initially bought the tent with fiberglass poles.The fiberglass in a high wind can break and when they do, they shatter. An aluminum pole will just bend and can be bent back.Also the aluminum poles are lighter and “hub less” which makes it easier to slide the poles through the top sleeves which is handy when setting it up by yourself.I would atleast get the 6 man though.I have stayed in a 4 man and the 6 man is oh so much better as you can stand up and get dressed in it which is a nice feature.Just my opinion after having used my Alaskan guide model all over Alaska even battled the winds on Kodiak.There are plenty of guy outs to help in batten down the hatches in heavy winds.
Re: cabelas alaskan guide 4 person tent606901001/20/12
Joined:Apr 2010Posts: 139gwlMember
MemberJoined:Apr 2010Posts: 139 I have the 3 and the 6 or 8 (not sure) they are great.I would only use them as a truck camping tent. They are huge and weigh a ton.I use the big one on longer trips I can put my cot a table and chair in the thing and still have room left over.I have had it in wind and heavey rain at Olympic National Park and never had a problem.I was given the smaller one.I wanted a two man and got the three.It is good but the enrty is too low and the bottom is too high, kind of a pain in the butt. Still it is a great tentBoth tents are well thought out and strong as heck.I am not sure about hot weather but they do seem to breath (vent) well.I am taking my family to Deah Valley in March and I may have a better idea about heat them.I hope so.
Re: cabelas alaskan guide 4 person tent606901301/20/12
Joined:Jun 2011Posts: 316NEhunterCampfire Regular
Campfire RegularJoined:Jun 2011Posts: 316 I have the 6 man Cabelas Alaskan Guide tent and it is a great tent. As others have said, it is a little tough for one guy to put up, but it can be done. Very nice tent.
Re: cabelas alaskan guide 4 person tent607001801/20/12
Joined:Jan 2006Posts: 458BigWaveCampfire Regular
Campfire RegularJoined:Jan 2006Posts: 458 I’ve had a 6 man for about 10 years now.Great tent.Tough to put up alone, but a great tent!
Re: cabelas alaskan guide 4 person tent607069001/20/12
Joined:Jan 2003Posts: 2,559docdbCampfire Guide
Campfire GuideJoined:Jan 2003Posts: 2,559 I’m not sure which Cabelas tent this was, but I spent a long night in this caribou outfitters camp
Re: cabelas alaskan guide 4 person tent607158001/20/12
Joined:Apr 2008Posts: 8,196old_willysCampfire Outfitter
Campfire OutfitterJoined:Apr 2008Posts: 8,196 I purchased the Cabela’s Outfitter Series� XWT-Xtreme Weather Tent last year;it is really well made and works well in poor weather. I got to use it in the high sierras in a fall snow storm only 5 inches of snow and but inside I never noticed.If you read the reviews and 108 reviews gave it 5 for 5, 11 others gave it 4 out of 5.
Re: cabelas alaskan guide 4 person tent607174701/20/12
Joined:Feb 2011Posts: 359Kurt52Campfire Regular
Campfire RegularJoined:Feb 2011Posts: 359 We have had two different 8 man Alaskan Guide tents since 1993.After 7 years of hard use the first was faded and the nylon weakened from UV exposure.It was working fine but we sold it to a friend for cheap.Our 2001 tent is going strong.Some years we spent up 6 weeks camped in them bird and big game hunting across the west. We haven’t used it much in BC due to high bear numbers.both blacks and grizzlies in some areas.They are great tents for all but the toughest winds.We never had one collapse, but you need to install all the guy ropes and stake them out in windy conditions.Ours was the only tent that was not flattened alongside Glendo Reservoir in WY one summer after sustained 60 mph winds during the night.The aluminum poles are tougher and easier to use than fiberglass.We had 3 or 4 fiberglass poles break on the first tent but ours came with spare parts and we just kept fixing them.The aluminum poles come with an over-sleeve to repair breaks as well.We have yet to break one.
Re: cabelas alaskan guide 4 person tent607188901/20/12
Joined:Sep 2005Posts: 4,054GSSPCampfire Guide
Campfire GuideJoined:Sep 2005Posts: 4,054 I’m not sure which Cabelas tent this was, but I spent a long night in this caribou outfitters campOMGoodness!That’s some wind.Outfitter I spent 10 days with North of Nome uses the 6 man version and they are great. Nice to be able to stand up to dress.Wind always blew; almost.Not much rain the week I was there but the guys before us had constant rain and the tent was quite dry when we arrived.Alan
Re: cabelas alaskan guide 4 person tent607204501/21/12
Joined:Dec 2011Posts: 1,693pseshooter300OPCampfire Ranger
OPCampfire RangerJoined:Dec 2011Posts: 1,693 From the videos I have watched on the tent on you tube they can take some wind and rain if they can stand the weather on kodiak they can probably stand what I need it for.
Re: cabelas alaskan guide 4 person tent607226201/21/12
Joined:Aug 2011Posts: 48CalcoyoteMember
MemberJoined:Aug 2011Posts: 48 I have the 6 man model Alaskan Guide.The first time I put it up it took a LONG time, but after you get the hang of it one person can put it up in about 20-25 minutes.I would recommend the 6 man due to the fact that it is nice to be able to stand up inside (I am 5’9″).I am selling mine to buy a wall tent (wife wants a tent with a stove).I would like to sell it now but need to put it up for photos and we are in the middle of rain season here in Western Oregon and I don’t want to get it wet taking photos (even though it is water proof).Alas, if the rain would ever stop.
Re: cabelas alaskan guide 4 person tent607408801/21/12
Joined:Aug 2010Posts: 986CoalCrackerCampfire Regular
Campfire RegularJoined:Aug 2010Posts: 986 If you don’t have to carry the tent, I would suggest looking at a Springbar (made in U.S.) or a Springbar knock-off called Kodiak Canvas (made in China).I bought a Kodiak Canvas last year for car-camping.It’s a great tent that should last my lifetime – but it’s very heavy.Also, it’s not a 4-season tent but should work well for what you mentioned you’ll be using it for.The Springbar and Kodiak Canvas are old-school, single-wall, cotton canvas tents that breath.They’re impregnated with silicone and handle the weather well.The Springbar is more expensive.I have read that the floor in the Kodiak Canvas is heavier and “more” waterproof.Cabela’s sells the Kodiak Canvas tent, and the reviews are generally through the roof – mostly five-star, but I take many of Cabela’s reviews with a grain of salt.Although I bought the Kodiak Canvas tent, I did buy the heavy canvas groundcloth from Springbar, which was the for the same size tent (10′ x 10′).They also make a 10′ x 14′.Here is a link to the Kodiak Canvas at Cabela’s website:Kodiak CanvasLast edited by CoalCracker;01/21/12.
Re: cabelas alaskan guide 4 person tent607612501/22/12
Joined:Feb 2004Posts: 4,742macrabbitCampfire Guide
Campfire GuideJoined:Feb 2004Posts: 4,742 I have two Cabela’s Outfitter XWTs, 8×8 and 10×10.Love ’em, been thru wind, snow, and rain.

Campfire Pistolero x2Only one human captain has ever survived battle with a Minbari fleet.Heis behind me.Youare in front of me. If you value your lives,be somewhere else.-Ambassador Delenn,Babylon 5

Re: cabelas alaskan guide 4 person tent607634901/22/12
Joined:Dec 2011Posts: 1,693pseshooter300OPCampfire Ranger
OPCampfire RangerJoined:Dec 2011Posts: 1,693 Thanks for the info guys they seem like good tents but a little difficult to put up buy yourself from the reviews from here and cabelas but all in all seems like a good tent to invest in
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FAQs

Are Cabela's tents any good? ›

Overall, the Cabela's West Wind Dome Tent is a great 3-season tent designed to withstand heavy winds and downpours (the material is 100% nylon taffeta with a 1,500mm waterproof rating). For an affordable price (C$249), the Cabela's West Wind Dome Tent is a great quality tent, heavy on useful features.

How do you set up a Cabela's Alaknak tent? ›

Cabela's Alaknak Tent Setup | Keefer Brothers Style - YouTube

How do you set up an Ozark Trail 6 person dome tent? ›

WMT Ozark Trail 6Person Dome Tent - YouTube

Are Alaknak tents any good? ›

Final Thoughts. For about $1,000 to my door, I think the Cabela's Ultimate Alaknak Outfitter Tent and stove are a really good value. It's not going to be able to do some things that more expensive specialty tents can do, but it will be totally adequate for many applications.

Who makes the Alaknak tent? ›

A rugged, traditional wall tent with enhanced safety features and user-friendly updates, the Ultimate Alaknak™ 12'x12' Outfitter Tent from Cabela's® offers extreme outdoor protection.

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