Administrative Order No. 129 – Mike Dunleavy (2022)

In 1990 the President of the United States signed into law the Americans with Disabilities Act (42 U.S.c. Sec. 12101 et seq.) mandating the elimination of discrimination against individuals with disabilities and requiring state and local governments, among other affected entities, to begin complying with the Act in 1992.

It has also been the policy of the State of Alaska, as expressed in the Alaska Human Rights Act (AS 18.80) and reflected in a number of other statutes, including

  • AS 11.76.130 (making it a crime to interfere with persons with disabilities)
  • AS 09.20.010 (permitting disabled people to serve as jurors)
  • AS 35.10.015 (regarding accessibility of public buildings),
  • AS 36.30.040(b)(16) (requiring procurement regulations to prohibit discrimination),
  • AS 39.25.150(21) (requiring the personnel rules to grant employment preference in state service to severely handicapped persons),
  • AS 44.21.500 -.509 (establishing a mechanism for dealing with complaints of employment discrimination in state government), and
  • AS 47.80 (governing programs for people with disabilities)

to eliminate and prevent discrimination because of physical or mental disability in employment, in credit and financing practices, in places of public accommodation, in the sale, lease, or rental of real property, and in government policies, practices, and services. In addition AS 18.80.200(b) makes it the policy of the state to encourage and enable physically and mentally disabled persons to participate fully in the social and economic life of the state and to engage in remunerative employment.

Therefore, in furtherance of the State of Alaska’s long standing commitment to human rights and equal opportunity for people with disabilities and to ensure compliance with title I and title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, I, Walter J. Hickel, Governor of the State of Alaska, under the authority granted by article III, section 1, of the Alaska Constitution and by AS 44.17.060, hereby order the following as the policy of the executive branch of state government for the provision of services to and employment of people with disabilities and establish the Americans with Disabilities Act compliance program for the executive branch of Alaska state government.

AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT COMPLIANCE PROGRAM

Section

I. Purpose

II. Policy

III. Supplement to Earlier Orders

IV. Roles and Responsibilities

V. Department Compliance Programs

VI. Technical Guidance and Assistance

VII. Training

VIII. Annual ADA Compliance Program Audit Report

X. Policy Dissemination

XI. Recordkeeping

XII. Definitions

XIII. Effective Date

I. PURPOSE:

It is the purpose of this order and the Americans with Disabilities Act compliance program:

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A. To prevent and eliminate discrimination against individuals with disabilities in employment and public services within state government;

B. To establish policies, guidelines and procedures for state agencies to follow to ensure compliance with title I and title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended, and their implementing regulations.

II. POLICY:

It is the policy of the state that:

A. No qualified individual with a disability shall be excluded, by reason of such disability, from participation in or be denied the benefits of the services, programs, or activities of a state agency, or be subjected to discrimination by any such agency.

B. No agency shall discriminate against a qualified individual with a disability because of the disability of such individual in regard to job application procedures, the hiring, advancement, or discharge of employees, employee compensation, job training, and any other term, condition, and privilege of employment.

C. Each agency shall operate each of its services, programs, and activities so that a service, program, or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities.

III. SUPPLEMENT TO EARLIER ORDERS:

This order supplements Administrative Order No. 18, dated November 22, 1972; Administrative Order No. 59, dated June 20, 1980; Administrative Order No. 75, dated April 8, 1983; Administrative Order No. 76, dated May 23, 1983; Administrative Order No. 81, dated October 25, 1984; Administrative Order No. 86, dated March 4, 1986; Administrative Order No. 93, dated March 4, 1987; and Administrative Order No. 109, dated May 13, 1988, by setting the controlling policies in regard to disability issues.

IV. ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:

A. The Office of the Governor will retain overall responsibility for the coordination of the state’s efforts to comply with and carry out its responsibilities under this order and the Americans with Disabilities Act. The governor shall appoint an official from within the state to serve as the State ADA Coordinator and make available to the public and state agencies the name, title, office address, and telephone number of the selected official.

B. The State ADA Coordinator will:

(1) Coordinate and direct the activities of agencies under this order and the efforts of state agencies to comply with title I and title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act;

(2) Serve as the state’s primary contact and liaison with the public and agencies on compliance issues regarding the Americans With Disabilities Act and the state’s ADA compliance program;

(3) Ensure compliance with the order;

(4) Communicate to the public and interested individuals information regarding the ADA compliance program and the names, office addresses, and telephone numbers of agency ADA coordinators appointed under this order;

(5) Convene and facilitate meetings of the ADA taskforce assigned in this order with interdepartmental responsibilities for providing technical guidance and assistance;

(6) Serve as the primary point of service for and the overall coordinator of the state’s responses to all complaints filed against state agencies with federal and state compliance agencies under the title II compliance procedures (28 C.F.R. 35.170) where the allegations are that the state discriminated in its services, policies, or practices, or failed to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

C. Each commissioner is responsible for ensuring the effective implementation of this order within her or his department and ensuring compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. Each commissioner shall designate an official within the department to serve as the Department ADA Coordinator and the overall administrator of the department’s ADA compliance program. Each commissioner shall make available to the public, the State ADA Coordinator, and department employees the name, title, office address and telephone number of the selected official. The Department ADA Coordinator shall receive guidance and direction from the department commissioner and the State ADA Coordinator on matters dealing with the Americans with Disabilities Act and is responsible for assuring timely and adequate requests for appropriations to implement the department’s ADA compliance program.

D. The Department ADA Coordinator will:

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(1) Coordinate the department’s efforts to comply with and carry out its responsibilities under title I and title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act;

(2) Serve as the department’s primary liaison between the department, the public, and other agencies on issues with the Americans with Disabilities Act and this order;

(3) Supervise the preparation and drafting of the department’s title II self-evaluation required under 28 C.F.R. 35.105 and any transition plans developed under 28 C.F.R. 35.150;

(4) Maintain the department’s self-evaluation on file and make it available for public inspection as required by 28 C.F.R. 35.105 and the State ADA Compliance Program;

(5) Supervise the department’s title II complaint procedure, as required by 28 C.F.R. 35.107, and ensure that, for any complaint communicated to the department alleging noncompliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act or alleging any actions that would be prohibited by the Act or its implementing regulations, an investigation is conducted and the complaint is resolved promptly and equitably;

(6) Develop a training plan in consultation and cooperation with the Productivity Improvement Center in the Division of Personnel and Office of Equal Employment Opportunity, Department of Administration for department employees to ensure that managers, supervisors, and employees who provide direct services to the public are aware of their responsibilities under the Americans with Disabilities Act, the state policy, and this order, and are sensitized to the needs of people with disabilities;

(7) Direct the activities of the division directors and ADA coordinators within the department in complying with this order and with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

E. Each division director is responsible for ensuring the effective implementation of the department ADA compliance program within her or his division and ensuring compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. Directors of divisions with 50 or more employees shall appoint a Division ADA Coordinator to administer the division’s ADA compliance program and shall make available to the public, the Department ADA Coordinator, the State ADA Coordinator, and division employees the name, title, office address, and telephone number of the selected employee.

F. The director in smaller divisions and the Division ADA Coordinator in divisions with 50 or more employees will, under the guidance and review of the Department ADA Coordinator:

(1) Coordinate the division’s efforts to comply with and carry out its responsibilities under title I and title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act, this order, and department directives;

(2) Serve as the division’s primary liaison between the division, the public, and other agencies on issues regarding the Americans with Disabilities Act and this order;

(3) Oversee and coordinate the preparation of the division’s title II self-evaluation required under 28 C.F.R. 35.105 and assist in the preparation of any transitional plans developed under 28 C.F.R. 35.150;

(4) Serve as the coordinator for ADA complaints within the division;

(5) Ensure that notice is given to applicants, participants, beneficiaries, and other interested persons on information regarding the Americans with Disabilities Act as required in 28 C.F.R. 35.106.

V. DEPARTMENT COMPLIANCE PROGRAMS:

Each department will implement a program to ensure that it is in compliance with title I and title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The department ADA compliance program must include the following components and measures:

A. The appointment of a Department ADA Coordinator and division ADA coordinators for divisions with 50 or more employees by May 1, 1992 and as needed thereafter to fill vacancies;

B. An evaluation of the department’s current services, policies, and practices, as required in 28 C.F.R. 35.105, to be completed initially for public comment by June 15, 1992, finalized by January 26, 1993, updated through June 30, 1993; and updated annually thereafter;

C. A plan of action, including a timetable, for making the necessary modifications to current services, policies, and practices, and the effects thereof, that do not or may not meet the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act and its implementing regulations, to be completed initially by January 26, 1993, updated through June 30, 1993, and updated annually thereafter;

D. Transition plans, as required in 28 C.F.R. 35.150, in the event that structural changes to facilities will be undertaken to achieve program accessibility, to be completed initially by July 26, 1992, updated through June 30, 1993, and updated annually thereafter;

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E. An interim complaint procedure adopted under paragraphs IX.B. and IX.C., meeting the standards imposed by 28 C.F.R. 35.107, to be employed until the regulations referred to in paragraph IX.A. below have been adopted in accordance with the Administrative Procedure Act and have taken effect. Such an interim procedure must provide for prompt and equitable resolution of complaints alleging any action that would be prohibited by title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act;

F. A plan for providing notice to applicants, participants, beneficiaries, and other interested persons on the provisions of title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act and its implementing regulations as required by 28 C.F.R. 35.106, to be completed by July 26, 1992;

C. A plan for training managers, supervisors, and employees who provide direct services to the public in their responsibilities under the Americans with Disabilities Act and sensitizing them to the needs of people with disabilities to be completed by September 1, 1992, updated through June 30, 1993, and updated annually thereafter.

VI. TECHNICAL GUIDANCE AND ASSISTANCE:

A. The Division of Personnel and Office of Equal Employment Opportunity in the Department of Administration will provide technical guidance and assistance to agencies on how to comply with the employment provisions of title I and title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

B. The Division of Engineering and Operations in the Department of Transportation and Public Facilities will provide technical guidance and assistance to state agencies on developing transition plans and making structural changes to state-owned facilities to achieve program accessibility, and on providing appropriate signage on buildings and other facilities.

C. The Division of General Services in the Department of Administration will provide technical guidance and assistance to agencies on procurement of assistive technologies and on issues where structural changes are required on state-leased facilities to achieve program accessibility.

D. The Division of Information Services in the Department of Administration will provide technical guidance and assistance to agencies on telecommunication devices for the deaf and other issues having to do with making telecommunications accessible within the state;

E. The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation in the Department of Education will provide technical advice to agencies on the nature of a disability and reasonable accommodations.

VII. TRAINING:

A. Each department will ensure that program managers, supervisors, and staff providing direct services to the public receive appropriate training to perform their duties under the Americans with Disabilities Act.

B. The Division of Personnel and Office of Equal Employment Opportunity’s Productivity Improvement Center will provide advice and assistance to agencies in developing training plans and meeting training needs. Agencies shall submit the ADA training plans required under paragraph V.E. of this order and requests for training to the Productivity Improvement Center. Agencies will be responsible for training costs.

VIII. ANNUAL ADA COMPLIANCE PROGRAM AUDIT REPORT:

The Division of Audit and Management Services in the Office of Management and Budget, Office of the Governor shall conduct an annual performance audit of the State ADA Compliance Program, corresponding with the state fiscal year, and submit an audit report to the Governor and the State ADA Coordinator by September 30, 1993 and annually thereafter.

IX. COMPLAINT PROCEDURES:

A. Within 90 days of the date of this order, the State ADA Coordinator will prepare for adoption under AS 44.62.020 – 44.62.290 regulations setting out a complaint procedure meeting the requirements of 28 C.F.R. 35.107 which provide for prompt and equitable resolution of complaints alleging any action which would be prohibited by title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act. Public hearings under AS 44.62.210 may be conducted under the auspices of the Governor’s Council for the Handicapped and Gifted. The regulations shall be adopted by the Governor and enforced as provided in the regulations.

B. Until the foregoing regulations are adopted1 agencies shall follow the complaint procedures established under Administrative Order No. 81 for resolving complaints alleging violations of title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

C. For internal complaints of employment discrimination, and for employment discrimination complaints filed with federal or state compliance agencies under 29 C.F.R. 1630, 28 C.F.R. 35.170, or AS 128.80.220, agencies shall follow the procedures established under AS 44.21.505 by the Division of Personnel and Office of Equal Employment Opportunity in the Department of Administration.

X. POLICY DISSEMINATION:

A. Each agency shall post the state policy in Section II of this order in the form provided by the State ADA Coordinator on all bulletin boards and at every facility and office.

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B. Each commissioner and division director shall ensure that copies of this order are disseminated to all managers and supervisors and that copies of the policy are included in all employee handbooks and department operating policies and procedures manuals.

C. The director of the Division of Personnel and Office of Equal Employment Opportunity shall ensure that a copy of this order is provided to all recruitment resources and to labor unions representing state employees.

XI. RECORDKEEPING:

A. An agency, as required by 29 C.F.R. 1602, shall maintain employee records, including applications, employee files, and agency anecdotal employee records, for a minimum of one year or, if an employment discrimination complaint has been filed, until the complaint is finally resolved, whichever is longer.

B. An agency, as required by 28 C.F.R. 35.105(c), shall maintain on file and make available for public inspection for at least three years following completion of its self-evaluation:

(1) A list of the interested persons consulted in preparing the agency’s self-evaluation and transition plans;

(2) A description of areas examined and any problems identified; and,

(3) A description of any actions taken and modifications made.

XII. DEFINITIONS:

Unless the context indicates otherwise, in this order

(1) “ADA” means the Americans With Disabilities Act;

(2) “agency” or “state agency” means a department, office, agency, public corporation, board, commission, authority, or other organizational unit of the executive branch of state government excluding the University of Alaska and the Alaska Railroad Corporation;

(3) “commissioner” means the chief executive officer of an executive department or other agency with cabinet-level reporting status;

(4) “department” means one of the principal departments of the executive branch or any other agency approved by the State ADA Coordinator to function as a department under this order;

(5) “disability” means, with respect to an individual, a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more of the major life activities of such individual; a record of such an impairment; or being regarded as having such an impairment, as defined for title I of ADA in 29 C.F.R. 1630.2(g) and for title II of ADA in 28 C.F.R. 35.104;

(6) “qualified individual with a disability” means with respect to employment, as defined in 29 C.F.R. 1630.2(m), an individual with a disability who satisfies the requisite skill, experience, education and other job-related requirements of the employment position such individual holds or desires and who, with or without reasonable accommodation, can perform the essential functions of the position;

For purposes of programs and services other than employment, “qualified individual with a disability”, as defined in 28 C.F.R. 35.104, means an individual with a disability who, with or without reasonable modifications to rules, policies, or practices, the removal of architectural, communication, or transportation barriers, or the provision of auxiliary aids and services, meets the essential eligibility requirements for the receipt of services or the participation in programs or activities provided by a public entity;

(7) “order” means Administrative Order No.129;

(8) “state” means the executive branch of Alaska state government.

XIII. EFFECTIVE DATE:

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This order takes effect immediately.

DATED at Juneau, Alaska this 22 day of April, 1992.

By: S/S Walter J. Hickel
Walter J. Hickel
Governor of the State of Alaska

I, Tony Knowles, Governor of the State of Alaska, make the following findings:

1, 16, and 24, of the Alaska Constitution, and in recognition of the findings concerning perceived institutional intolerance in state agencies set out in the final report of the Governor’s Commission on Tolerance, renew the state’s commitment to diversity in the state workplace free from discrimination and harassment.. I declare that it is the continued goal of the executive branch to eliminate discrimination and harassment in the contexts of the state as an employer and service provider; to assure timely response to discrimination and harassment complaints concerning state personnel or services; to prohibit and prevent discriminatory behavior in the state workplace based on race, sex, color, religion, physical or mental disability, sexual orientation, or economic status, to assure that all Alaskans have the opportunity to compete fairly for state jobs; and to assure that state personnel serve all Alaskans with respect.. The Department of Administration shall standardize new hire orientation to assure that new state personnel are advised of their rights and responsibilities with respect to human rights, equal employment opportunity, and civil rights law and of their responsibility for contributing to a positive workplace for all state workers.. With the approval of the Department of Administration, each state agency may adapt the training to specific needs and circumstances of that agency and may use current, successful training programs to avoid duplication with the statewide program, with the understanding that all agency training must include all essential elements of the statewide program.. To the maximum extent possible, all state employees currently serving in a supervisory position must complete a diversity training course described in this provision within one year after the effective date of this Order and state employees hired for a supervisory position after the effective date of this Order must complete the training course within one year after hire.. Each state agency shall engage in active recruitment outreach activities, including job fairs, that reach more diverse segments of Alaska’s population and cooperative efforts with Alaska Native and other ethnic organizations to provide training on how to apply for state jobs.. Implement customer service training for all state agency employees who deal with the public on a day-to-day basis and an informal public service complaint process within each state agency.. Each state agency shall establish an open and publicized complaint process through which the public can make their concerns known to the state agency regarding perceived discrimination in state service delivery.

The Alaska Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the Recall Dunleavy case while social distancing.

A little set up: One of the claims against Dunleavy is that he broke the law by refusing to appoint a judge within by the 45-day deadline set in state law.. The state’s position has centered on a novel reading of Alaska recall law, arguing that the Recall Dunleavy campaign not only needed to prove in its 200-word recall statement that the governor broke the law but that in doing so caused harm.. “The governor refused to appoint a judge within a specific timeline,” said attorney Margaret Paton-Walsh as a justice interjected “As required by law.”. What we have is the governor refused to meet a statutory deadline.. “If the governor can be subject to recall every time anybody thinks that he’s violated a law,” said Paton-Walsh before she was interrupted again.. Hickel, he ultimately did make his appointment within 45 days, and also Gov.. This is not something new to governors.. She went on to argue that the Supreme Court would be setting a dangerous precedent to allow a recall to move forward any time the governor didn’t follow state law.. Lindemuth said it should be left up to voters to decide whether or not the violation of a law is severe enough to be removed from office, but noted that if there is a test for severity, then it wouldn’t apply to this case because the refusal to follow the timeline to appoint a judge is serious.. If the Supreme Court was skeptical of any of the claims, it might be on the court vetoes.

A delayed roadblock and delayed by a roadblock.

In a week that’s been all about lawsuits and legal challenges, Attorney General Kevin Clarkson and the Dunleavy administration were handed two more losses this week.. On Tuesday, a Superior Court Judge denied the state’s request to end the lawsuit over the collection of union dues and in doing so issued a preliminary injunction against the state’s efforts.. The same day the Alaska Supreme Court also rejected the administration’s request for an “emergency” hearing in order to put a halt to the ballot initiative group’s signature gathering efforts.. The case is an effort to meddle with the collection of union dues for public sector unions and is based on what Superior Court Judge Gregory Miller has already said is an incorrect reading of the U.S. Supreme Court Case Janus v. AFSCME.. The state, for its part, has asked the court to render a final verdict on the case so the state can move on with appealing the case (it’s long been thought that this case is an attempt at a national precedent-setting test case and this would support that theory).. The state also argues that the preliminary injunction should be denied, that the state should win the case and that ASEA’s counterclaims should be dismissed.. Miller agreed, noting that the state’s latest filings didn’t even attempt to make a convincing case.. The state immediately appealed the order to the Superior Court, but that was rejected and signature booklets were issued on Friday.. Superior Court Judge Gregory Miller’s latest order on the case takes the state to task for not even really trying, noting that nothing in the state’s latest filings supported their position.

Gov. Mike Dunleavy says the law bars him from talking about how he handled misconduct by Alaska's attorney general. Legal experts disagree.

The emailed statement went on to assert that Dunleavy is bound by Alaska law that makes personnel matters confidential.. Alaska’s News Source sent Turner multiple emails dated Sept. 7, 8 and 14 requesting an on-camera interview with Dunleavy to discuss the matter.. Turner responded to a request on Sept. 8, writing, “Personnel issues are by their nature sensitive and there are various confidentiality rules that apply, including in this instance, AS 39.28.060, making the complaint process and investigation confidential.”. Receiving no response, another email was delivered on Sept. 14, to which Turner responded, “I appreciate your interest in this story, however, AS 39.28.060 makes the complaint process and investigation confidential.”. Two attorneys who specialize in media law and public records matters independently told the Alaska’s News Source investigative team that Turner’s response, repeatedly citing a law that deals with employment discrimination complaints, does not make sense.. McKay said the woman’s identity can still be protected while the governor answers for his own actions.. If nothing else, he accepted the resignation of his attorney general.. We know that the attorney general of the state took actions.. Turner did not specifically cite the section of Alaska law that makes many personnel records confidential, but he has repeatedly said the situation cannot be discussed because it is a personnel matter.. “The former attorney general is no different.”. Since the start of the pandemic, and with the exception of two weeks in June, the governor has held a weekly news conference to answer questions from reporters.

It’s a tendency our founders warned against, and one that the Legislature and Alaskans should keep an eye on.

"There is a degree of watchfulness over all men possessed of power or influence upon which the liberties of mankind much depend.. His administration is the subject of multiple major lawsuits, and he has shaken up the fundamentals of executive agency structure and the services the state provides.. Dunleavy’s most divisive acts thus far: They are the hallmarks of an executive who is testing the limits of his power, seeking to consolidate and expand that power where possible.. To retain their jobs, Babcock instructed that their application be coupled with a statement that would “affirmatively say, ‘Yes, I want to work for the Dunleavy administration,” going on to say a failure to submit a letter of resignation and re-application would be viewed as expressing a desire to be terminated.. For the first time, rank-and-file state employees, many of whom had worked for multiple administrations, were forced to adopt a political agenda if they wanted to keep their jobs.. The next step down the path of power consolidation came soon after Gov.. By administrative order, he moved the budget directors from each state agency into the Office of Management and Budget, making them more directly under his control and that of incoming OMB Director Donna Arduin.. Billed as a maneuver to deal with a serious budget situation more efficiently, one practical effect of the change was to make the budget directors answerable to the governor’s office, not the departments whose budgets they crafted.. It also meant that all budget inquiries, whether from legislators, the press or the public, had to be routed through OMB — and answers were not always forthcoming.. The Legislature sued .. When the Legislature finally managed to pass a budget, Gov.. Dunleavy again asserted his authority to unwind their actions.. Dunleavy has also made plays to expand his authority over institutions over which he doesn’t have direct control.. He vetoed $130 million in funding from the University of Alaska , then dangled a plan under which the cuts would be spread over two years instead of one — with the express proviso that the Board of Regents make the cuts according to his dictates.. But from a standpoint outside the political machine, they show a willingness to challenge the authority of other branches of government and make end-runs around any impediment to his control.

There has been pushback by some to Gov. - elect Mike Dunleavy’s request that all at-will state employees submit resignation letters before they can re-apply for their jobs and continue working under his administration.

- elect Mike Dunleavy’s request that all at-will state employees submit resignation letters before they can re-apply for their jobs and continue working under his administration.. “Governor-elect Mike Dunleavy’s call for the resignation of nearly all exempt employees, on the other hand, is creating anxiety and uncertainty for committed, nonpolitical public servants such as prosecutors who work tirelessly to keep our state running,” Walker said in a written statement over the weekend.. “If an at-will employee declines the request to submit a letter of resignation, we will take that as evidence they do not wish to serve in the Dunleavy Administration,” wrote Dunleavy’s chief of staff, Tuckerman Babcock in a statement Monday.. An employee at the Department of Natural Resources, who wishes to remain anonymous, told Channel 2 that many exempt and partially-exempt staff at the office have expressed deep concern over the transition team’s request.. “We are confident that each at-will employee can find a few minutes to submit a letter of resignation to the new governor and let us know if he/she wishes to continue as an at-will public servant.”. “When the people elect a new governor, all at-will employees should submit a letter of resignation.. The Department of Administration is working to clarify the numbers of exempt and partially-exempt employees who have been asked to submit resignation letters before the Nov. 30 cut-off.. A special assistant to the Commissioner of the Department of Administration, Minta Montalbo, said more information would be released Monday afternoon, including a list of answers to frequently asked questions for state employees.. Jonathon Taylor, a spokesperson for the Department of Public Safety, said the department does not know “precisely how many” exempt and partially-exempt employees have been asked to send in resignation letters.. Karen Montoya, communications director with Department of Fish and Game, writes that there are a total of 55 exempt and partially exempt employees in that department, but she "cannot guarantee that everyone has received letters.". A public information officer with the Department of Environmental Conservation, Laura Achee, confirmed that nine exempt and partially exempt employees received the memo.. The Department of Law, the Department of Revenue and the Office of the Governor did not respond to Channel 2's requests for how many employees had received resignation requests in time for this story's first publication.

Gov. Mike Dunleavy promised to reduce crime and protect permanent fund dividends in his first State of the State address.

I’m here today because of the people of Alaska, who put their faith in me and in my vision, for our great state.. And this evening, as I stand before the people of Alaska delivering my first State of the State Address, I reflect upon where we are as a state, the opportunity before us and what this point in history means for Alaska.. I’m governor today because of the campaign promises I made to the people of Alaska on the issues most of us believe in.. And finally, that together, we will restore the trust of the Alaskan people in its government and its elected officials.. In order to address the fiscal issues that have plagued our state for years, we need a permanent fiscal plan, a plan that will put our state on solid footing for decades to come.. Dick is a former teacher, an insurance agent and retired legislator, who in the late ’70s and early ’80s had the foresight to understand that the people of Alaska, the people of Alaska, through constitutional amendments and the initiative process, could help us control our spending and develop a sustainable fiscal plan.. Enlightened legislators, such as Representative Randolph, trusting the people of Alaska, put forth a number of constitutional amendments, including the Permanent Fund, to try and bring order to the spending mania.. I want to thank you for your foresight and wisdom, coupled with the belief that the people, individual Alaskans, through constitutional amendments, are the key to securing Alaska’s future.. These three constitutional amendments will require that both the people of Alaska and their elected officials work closely together to secure our future.. For Alaska to fully realize our potential, including our location on the globe, our vast resources and our unbridled quality of life, we must look to other industries and investment to come to Alaska.. For those that have little hope that Alaska can diversify its economy, we need only to look to two small Alaska companies that, through good old-fashioned capitalism and entrepreneurship, created thriving businesses right here in our state.. The women and children of Alaska must be made safe, and we have an obligation — all of us in this room — to do everything we possibly can to stop this scourge in Alaska.. I ask everyone in this room tonight and across Alaska to join in making Alaska the safest state in the country.. We’re all part of the greatest experiment in self-government in the history of the world: A government by the people, for the people and of the people.

Videos

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2. Ketchikan Workshop: Introductory Remarks from The Honorable Mike Dunleavy, Governor of Alaska
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3. Governor Dunleavy's 2019 State of the State Address
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4. Gov. Dunleavy: Biden admin should declare nationwide emergency on energy
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5. Governor Mike Dunleavy on Budget, Spending and What Alaska Can Provide the Nation
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6. Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee
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